View From My Loft

View From My LoftView From My Loft – Luma Lofts, South Park, Downtown Los Angeles, California, USA

Copyright 2013 O. Bisogno Scotti,  All Rights Reserved.

This is the view from my 6th Floor loft at Luma Lofts. It’s a corner loft so there are windows facing east and south. The above photo taken at twilight is facing east towards the AT&T Building. On the left is Elleven Lofts (not a misspelling), and on the right is Evo Lofts. Directly below my window and out of view from the camera is the pool area.

Nikon D3 DSLR, AF NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8D, Nikon MC-20 remote cableManfrotto 3221 tripodManfrotto 3047 studio head, exposure: f/14.0, 5 sec., ISO 200, exposure program: Aperture Priority, focus mode: manual, M-Up mode, white balance: Auto, capture date and time: 7/22/2013 8:31 pm.

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10 thoughts on “View From My Loft

  1. Jackie. thanks for liking this. I thought about taking it for a long time. Every night working at my computer, I would turn and look out the window and go, “Oh, wow!” Finally I set up my camera and tripod, and recorded that feeling.

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    • I always put all of the capture info below each image:

      Nikon D3 DSLR, AF NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8D, Nikon MC-20 remote cable, Manfrotto 3221 tripod, Manfrotto 3047 studio head, exposure: f/14.0, 5 sec., ISO 200, exposure program: Aperture Priority, focus mode: manual, M-Up mode, white balance: Auto, capture date and time: 7/22/2013 8:31 pm.

      As you can see, the required shutter speed was 5 sec. Which mandates the use of a tripod…but I use a tripod every chance I get, not just for the increased sharpness, but also because it slows you down and makes you think about what should be in the frame and what should not.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Of course, there it all is! I guess I get wrapped up so much in the visual I don’t bother doing “the homework.” A 5 sec shutter. Fab.

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      • Don’t feel bad Shannon. You are not the first person to miss the technical data. I started this blog as a place to share visual and technical information, and ideas. I’ve never had any qualms about revealing how things are done since I am secure in the fact that no one could replicate my images anyway. There are factors other than technical involved such as heart, soul, vision….so why not share! 🙂

        I could have used a faster shutter speed than 5 sec., but I wanted a small aperture, f/14. The reason for this is to get more depth of field (everything in focus from foreground to background). There is one other reason. If you look at the light pole (bottom right) you will see a star burst. This is due to the small aperture of f/14. The smaller the aperture, the larger the star burst. Here’s another example of star bursts: http://wp.me/pAnZn-1V2

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh yes! Of course I can see that burst, now that you point it out. Well worth the long exposure and small(est?) opening. I must play with these myself. Perhaps when I’m not dickering in the garden or herding kids. 🙂

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    • If you went to the other link I sent you, you will see that the star bursts are much more accentuated. That is because I used f/16, a smaller aperture than f/11.

      You are correct Shannon. The higher the number, the smaller the opening.

      I can relate. I find it hard to find time for art photography in between my commercial jobs.

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